Should You Join KDP Select?

Like most indie authors, I had to make a decision when signing up with Amazon whether or not to enroll my books in KDP Select. Not knowing what to do, I did some searching and reading to see what other authors thought. The consensus I seemed to get was that it may not be worth it. Quite a few authors feel that getting your stuff out on as many platforms as possible is the best bet.

So I took that route initially. I put my stuff on Smashwords and Google Play, and sat back to see what happened. The difference has been rather striking.

Now, before I get into any of this, let me stress, as I’ve done with my posts on Twitter, that I don’t pretend to know everything on this subject nor that my experiences are definitive. They’re just that—my experiences. And, to preface all this, understand that I promote only my Amazon book pages on Twitter. I have links elsewhere on my blog, but I don’t tweet to SW or GP.

It’s probably no great revelation that 95% of my sales are on Amazon. I sell no more than a few books a week on Smashwords, maybe one or two elsewhere, and I’ve sold exactly one on GP.

So when I got ready to launch The Witches’ Covenant, I began thinking that having access to Amazon’s promotional tools might be worth giving up those few extra sales. The Wizard’s Daughters had been trending downward anyway, and had finally starting slipping off the Historical Fantasy bestseller list. I figured it would be worth seeing if enrolling those two in KDP Select was worth the exclusivity.

I pulled TWD down from everywhere but Amazon, and began working on my promotional strategy for TWC. But a funny thing happened when TWD went live in Kindle Unlimited: A whole bunch of people began downloading it, to the point that it shot back up the bestseller list, settling in around 5,000 overall, a point it hasn’t been at since January. And, interestingly enough, the sales haven’t appeared to change—the KU downloads don’t seem to be cannibalizing them.

What this suggests to me is that there are an awful lot of KU folks who just don’t buy books anymore. They only read things that they can download as part of their KU subscription. And if your book isn’t in KU, you’re cut off from that readership. Not fair, perhaps, but there it is.

That being said, I suspect this doesn’t apply for all books. It could well be that the previous prominence of TWD gave it some built-in visibility in KU when I signed it up. Still, the boost has been enough that I’m contemplating putting some of my other books in KU to see what happens.

I’m not ready to call myself a KDP Select convert, but this has definitely changed my thinking.

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